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BC SPCA grant instrumental in cat rescue success on Quadra Island

May 24, 2017

Over the past five years, the BC SPCA Community Animal Spay/Neuter Grant has provided vital support to organizations that dedicate their time to decreasing cat overpopulation.

Groups like Quadra Cat Rescue, which has received just over $15,000 and fixed 114 cats with the grant funding in the past four years, with another 18 cats to be spayed and neutered this year.

The support was just was the group needed to fulfil their mission.

The brainchild of Quadra Island resident Lara Fraser, the group was established in response to an epidemic of stray and feral cats in the community. Working with a small group of concerned citizens who became volunteers, Quadra Cat Rescue’s work began.

“We started off by trapping and fixing the ‘gas station cats’, a feral colony in a high-profile location here on Quadra Island,” says Janet Massey, treasurer of Quadra Cat Rescue.

“The six or so cats were being fed by a sympathetic woman, much to the dismay of the business owner. Now there are only two or three cats left, who are fed, monitored and are doing well.”

As rewarding as Quadra’s work may be, it does not come without its challenges.

“Spaying and neutering the cats is only the first step towards creating a humane community,” Massey says.

“It is our interactions with people that change attitudes long-term, and which often require the most care and attention.”

Other challenges include trapping in isolated or dimly lit locations, finding committed volunteers, and raising money for vet bills.

“Receiving grants from the BC SPCA has meant a lot to us. It has helped us plan ahead and put into place a system to fix many more cats than we would be able to otherwise,” Massey notes.

As a result of the BC SPCA Community Animal Spay Neuter Grant program, Quadra Cat Rescue has seen a significant reduction in vulnerable cats, with growing awareness and community involvement.

“As people learn more about animal welfare, mortality rates go down and the desire for rescue pets goes up,” Massey says. “Cats and kittens are now being adopted more now than ever.”